Change Control

Change control is used in Application Designer to lock definitions and track the history of changes to definitions. This shouldn't be mistaken with version control, it is simply a mechanism for indicating that particular developer is working on a particular definition and to keep a history of who has modified a particular definition and why. Generally you will want change control activated in your master development environment.

Change control is activated through Application Designer using Tools -> Change Control -> Administrator. The options are to:

  • Use Change Control Locking
  • Use Change Control History

Once change control locking and history are turned on, you'll also have the ability to lock all definitions through change control administrator.

Locking and Unlocking Definitions

Depending on your version of PeopleTools, locking and unlocking definitions may not be quite that intuitive.

Generally there are a few ways to lock a definition (providing it is unlocked):

  • From the open definition search dialog, you can right click on that definition and select lock
  • The lock toolbar button
  • If the definition is in a project, providing your in the development tab, you can right click on the object and select lock

Similarly there are a few ways to unlock a definition:

  • The unlock toolbar button
  • If the definition is in a project, providing your in the development tab, you can right click on the object and select unlock

Sometimes these two ways just don't seem to work (in particular on Application Packages!). In that case, you need to find who has the object locked (you can find this out by opening the object and reading the message dialog). Then navigate to Tools -> Change Control -> View Locked Definitions. Specify the definition type, and then the user. Right click on the definition you want to unlock and select Unlock Object.

Change control security is defined through permission lists. Specifically, under PeopleTools permissions for the permission list and Tools permissions. The delivered PTPT1200 permission list is a good example to look at. There are three levels of access:

  • Restricted Access - unable to lock or unlock objects or change history, effectively read only
  • Developer Access - ability to lock and unlock your own objects and update change history
  • Supervisor Access - ability to lock and unlock all definitions and update change history
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